The following books feature Arab, Middle Eastern or Muslim characters, culture or themes. 

 

Age 0-3

Baby Touch: Happy Eid!

Introduce your baby to Eid in this bright, interactive touch-and-feel book.

 

The Proudest Blue A Story of Hijab and Family, Ibtihaj Muhammad with S.K. Ali

This picture book narrates a loving, tender bond between two sisters. It’s a relatable, sweet story that shows the importance of the hijab in the Muslim faith and feeling pride in who you are. 

 

Mommy’s Khimar, Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow

A young Muslim girl spends a busy day wrapped up in her mother’s colorful headscarf

 

Under My Hijab, Hena Khan

The women in this girl’s life wear hijabs and also, sometimes don’t. They inspire her with all that they do and who they are. 

 

Crescent Moons and Pointed Minarets: A Muslim Book of Shapes, Hena Khan

Lavish, richly colored illustrations fill this beautiful book of shapes celebrating Muslim culture. “Hexagon is a tile, / bold and bright, / painted with an ayah / I love to recite.”

The Way to Jannah

A Lift-the-Flap Book designed for Muslim Babies

The ABC of Allah Loves Me

Each letter in the alphabet covers one of Allah’s beautiful names and attributes, with explanations threaded together using simple rhymes 

Allah Made Everything: The Song Book, Zain Bhika 

A book based on the lyrics of the well-loved children’s song by singer and songwriter Zain Bhikha

 

Age 3-5

Eid and the Moon Bangles, Sara Khan *NEW*

With its cheerful, kid-friendly, and vibrant illustrations and enticing storyline, Eid and the Moon Bangles teaches young readers about the significance of Ramadan and Eid; the importance of giving, even if it means sacrificing something we really want; and never giving up, especially when we wish good for others.

Under My Hijab, Hena Khan *NEW*

With rhyming text and cheerful illustrations, this book provides a friendly introduction to hijabs for all readers, and celebrates the many Muslim women and girls who choose to wear them.

The Red Lollipop, Rukhsana Khan

When Rubina comes home with her first birthday-party invitation, her mother asks why people in the US celebrate birthdays, as in Pakistan they do not. 

 

Riding a Donkey Backwards Wise and Foolish Tales of Mulla Nasruddin, Sean Taylor and the Khayaal Theatre

Timeless wisdom is found in absurdity in these tales of an iconic Muslim character known as the sagest man in the village -- and also its biggest fool. 

 

King for a Day, Rukhsana Khan

The Pakistani spring festival Basant has arrived, and Malik is getting ready for the traditional battle of kites. With stunning collages made of traditional Pakistani fabric, handmade paper, burlap, silk, and ribbon.

 

Like the Moon Loves the Sky, Hena Khan

The author shares her wishes for her children: "Inshallah you find wonder in birds as they fly. Inshallah you are loved, like the moon loves the sky." 

 

Halal Hot Dogs, Susannah Azia

Musa has the perfect idea for his special Jummah treat, but things don't go according to plan. Will Musa be able to get a yummy Jummah treat for his family?

The Arabic Quilt: An Immigrant Story, Aya Khalil

Kanzi’s family moves to a new school. Luckily, her new teacher values Kanzi’s culture and language. She helps Kanzi share her Egyptian culture and Arabic language with her classmates.

 

I’m New Here, Anne Sibley O’Brien

Back home, Jin and Fatimah knew their languages and were included in their classes. Being new, they now feel lonely and confused. This book shows how they feel and make friends.

 

Malala’s Magic Pencil, Malala Yousafzai

Malala dreamed of the things she’d do if she had a magic pencil. Even after bad men tried to stop her, Malala writes, using her words as the magic to spread a message of hope.

 

Bilal Cooks Daal, Aisha Saeed

Six-year-old Bilal is excited to help his dad make daal. Bilal wants to introduce his friends to his favourite dish. As the day goes on more kids join Bilal and his family, waiting to try the daal.

 

Age 5-7

Sitti's Secrets, Naomi Shihab Nye *NEW*
Naomi Shihab Nye is an award-winning poet whose father was a Palestinian refugee.  In Sitti’s Secrets, Mona, who lives in America, goes to visit her grandmother in a Palestinian village in the occupied West Bank. Although Mona does not speak a shared language with her grandmother (sitti in Arabic), they are able to communicate through gestures, music, and actions. It is a beautifully written and illustrated book about a loving relationship between a child and her grandmother.

Eid and the Moon Bangles, Sara Khan *NEW*

With its cheerful, kid-friendly, and vibrant illustrations and enticing storyline, Eid and the Moon Bangles teaches young readers about the significance of Ramadan and Eid; the importance of giving, even if it means sacrificing something we really want; and never giving up, especially when we wish good for others.

The Butter Man, Elizabeth Alalou *NEW*

While impatiently waiting for dinner, young Nora's father tells her about his childhood in Morocco where he learned valuable lessons in patience, perseverance, and hope. 

Snow in Jerusalem, Deborah de Costa *NEW*
Living in different neighborhoods of Jerusalem's Old City, Avi and Hamudi have no idea that they are both caring for the same stray cat, until one day, the beautiful cat leads them both on a journey that defies boundaries and ends with an unexpected snowfall in Jerusalem, in an enchanting story of peace, hope, and friendship. 

The Stars in My Geddoh's Sky, Claire Sidhom Matze *NEW*
When Alex's grandfather (Geddoh) comes for a visit from the Middle East, he brings with him presents and stories of his homeland that bring the two closer together, and when he prepares to leave, Alex's Geddoh gives him one special gift that the two can share for a lifetime.

Silent Music: A Story of Baghdad, James Rumford *NEW*

Like other children living in Baghdad, Ali loves soccer, music and dancing, but most of all, he loves the ancient art of calligraphy. When bombs begin to fall on his city, Ali turns to his pen, writing sweeping and gliding words to the silent music that drowns out the war all around him. Gorgeously illustrated with collage, pencil and charcoal drawings and, of course, exquisite calligraphy, this timely and yet universal story celebrates art and history but also offers young children a way to understand all they see and hear on the news.

The Librarian of Basra: A True Story from Iraq, Jeanette Winter *NEW*

Celebrated author-illustrator Jeanette Winter weaves a hopeful tale of one woman's courageous book rescue.
 

Muslim Girls Rise: Inspirational Champions of Our Time, Saira Mir *NEW*

Through short, information-rich biographies and vibrant illustrations, Muslim Girls Rise introduces young readers to the diverse and important contributions Muslim women have made, and role models they may never have heard of before, but whose stories they will never forget.

Baba, What Does My Name Mean?: A Journey to Palestine, Rifk Ebeid *NEW*
When Saamidah, a young Palestinian refugee, is asked by her friends what her name means, she isn't quite sure what to say. She turns to her baba for some answers - but what she gets is an adventure beyond her wildest dreams. Join Saamidah on a lyrical journey, with dazzling illustrations, that brings to life her beloved homeland and celebrates the richness of her cultural heritage and the determination to return.

Meet Yasmin!, Saadia Faruqui

Yasmin is an exuberant girl who is interested in everything from exploring to building to fashion. Each book in this series shares short stories from Yasmin’s life.

 

Sadiq and the Desert Star, Siman Nuurali

Sadiq’s baba tells him the story of the Desert Star. Learning about the stars sparks Sadiq's interest in outer space and he looks for others to help him start his dream space club.

 

Amazing Muslims Who Changed the World, Burhana Islam ·

In this stunningly illustrated and beautifully-written treasure trove of iconic amazing and hidden Muslim heroes, you'll find people you might know, as well as some you might not.

 

Age 7-11

Samir and Yonatan, Daniella Carmi *NEW*

When Samir, a young Palestinian boy, is scheduled to go to an Israeli hospital for an operation, he fears the worse, yet upon meeting a young Israeli boy, Yonatan, his fears begin to subside as they become friends through their talks about far away adventures. Suggested reading age 9-12. 

A Game For Swallows: To Die, to Leave, to Return, Abirached Zeina *NEW*

When Zeina was born, the civil war in Lebanon had been going on for six years, so it's just a normal part of life for her and her parents and little brother. When Zeina's parents don't return one afternoon from a visit to the other half of the city and the bombing grows ever closer, the neighbors in her apartment house create a world indoors for Zeina and her brother where it's comfy and safe, where they can share cooking lessons and games and gossip. Together they try to make it through a dramatic day in the one place they hoped they would always be safe--home.

The White Zone, Carolyn Marsden *NEW*

As American bombs fall on Baghdad during the Iraq War, ten-year-old cousins Nouri and Talib witness the growing violence between Sunni and Shiite Muslims. Suggested for readers aged 9-14. 

A Little Piece of Ground, Elizabeth Laird *NEW*
Twelve-year-old Karim Aboudi and his family are trapped in their Ramallah home by a strict curfew. Israeli tanks control the city in response to a Palestinian suicide bombing. Karim longs to play football with his mates – being stuck inside with his teenage brother and fearful parents is driving him crazy. When the curfew ends, he and his friend discover an unused patch of ground that's the perfect site for a football pitch. Nearby, an old car hidden intact under bulldozed buildings makes a brilliant den. But in this city there's constant danger, even for schoolboys. And when Israeli soldiers find Karim outside during the next curfew, it seems impossible that he will survive . . .  For readers 9+.

Oranges in No Man's Land, Elizabeth Laird *NEW*

Since her father left Lebanon to find work and her mother tragically died in a shell attack, ten-year-old Ayesha has been living in the bomb-ravaged city of Beirut with her granny and her two younger brothers. The city has been torn in half by civil war and a desolate, dangerous no man's land divides the two sides. Only militiamen and tanks dare enter this deadly zone, but when Granny falls desperately ill, Ayesha sets off on a terrifying journey to reach a doctor living in enemy territory. For readers 9+.

The Boy and the Wall, Amahl Bishara *NEW*

A bilingual children’s book in English and Arabic that tells the story of a Palestinian refugee boy who loves to play soccer, find turtles, and pick flowers. But the joy of being a child is overshadowed by the huge wall being built through his land. The Boy and the Wall is a story about how the separation wall has affected the lives of the people living in Aida Refugee Camp and an imaginative reflection of a child’s response to the wall.

The Day of Ahmed's Secret, Florence Parry Heide *NEW*

Ahmed drives his donkey cart through the streets of Cairo, delivering butane gas cylinders to his father's customers. He knows everyone and has a part to play in the life of the city. He is proud to be strong enough to help his family, but most of all he is proud of his precious secret, a secret that he keeps until the end of the day. The book reveals a lot about Ahmed's life, and finally his secret - that he can write his name.

Sami and The Time of Troubles, Florence Parry Heide *NEW*
Sami, a ten-year-old boy living with his family in war-torn Beirut, Lebanon, yearns for the day when he can live a normal, peaceful life, safe from the devastation of war.

Magical Land of Birthdays, Amirah Kassem

After receiving a magical cookbook and baking her birthday cake, Amirah is transported to the Magical Land of Birthdays and meets three birthday buddies from different corners of the world

 

Planet Omar, Zanib Mian

One of the best things about Omar is his HUGE imagination! He uses his imagination to deal with moving, starting a new school, bullying, and racism.

 

Age 11-14

Tasting the Sky: A Palestinian Childhood, Ibtisam Barakat *NEW*

In this groundbreaking memoir set in Ramallah during the aftermath of the 1967 Six-Day War, Ibtisam Barakat captures what it is like to be a child whose world is shattered by war. Winner of the Arab American National Museum Book Award for Children's/YA Literature.

Where The Streets Had A Name, Randa Abdel-Fattah, *NEW* 

Thirteen-year-old Hayaat is on a mission. She believes a handful of soil from her grandmother's ancestral home in Jerusalem will save her beloved Sitti Zeynab's life. The only problem is the impenetrable wall that divides the West Bank, as well as the check points, the curfews, the permit system and Hayaat's best friend Samy, who is mainly interested in football and the latest elimination on X-Factor, but always manages to attract trouble. But luck is on their side. Hayaat and Samy have a curfew-free day to travel to Jerusalem. However, while their journey may only be a few kilometres long, it may take a lifetime to complete. The story, told through Hayaat’s eyes, provides readers with a clear window into a young teen’s life under the Israeli occupation.

Samir and Yonatan, Daniella Carmi *NEW*

When Samir, a young Palestinian boy, is scheduled to go to an Israeli hospital for an operation, he fears the worse, yet upon meeting a young Israeli boy, Yonatan, his fears begin to subside as they become friends through their talks about far away adventures. Suggested reading age 9-12. 

Ten Things I Hate About Me, Randa Abdel-Fattah *NEW*
A 16-year-old Australian-Muslim-Lebanese teen wonders who she really is as she straddles two cultural realities.  Randa Abdel-Fattah's award-winning novel (suggested for readers aged 11-18) is about finding your place in life and learning to accept yourself and your culture.

A Place at the Table, Faruqi Saadia Faruqi *NEW*

Sara, a Pakistani American girl, and Elizabeth, a white Jewish girl, bond in a cooking class in this story about sixth grade, food, friendship, family and what it means to belong.

Habibi, Naomi Shihab Nye *NEW*

When fourteen-year-old Liyana Abboud moves with her family from St. Louis to Jerusalem, she encounters an entirely new life, exploring Jerusalem, making mischief with her brother, and building a relationship with a Jewish boy.

Santa Claus in Baghdad: Stories About Teens in the Arab World: And Other Stories about Teens in the Arab World, Elsa Marsten *NEW*
This lively collection of eight short stories about Arab teenagers living in Iraq, Tunisia, Egypt, the West Bank, Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, and a Palestinian refugee camp engagingly depicts young people's experiences growing up in the Middle East. With accompanying notes that provide contextual information, Santa Claus in Baghdad brings a fresh perspective to youth literature about the Arab world.

A Stone in My Hand, Cathryn Clinton *NEW*
A Stone in My Hand is the haunting story of a sensitive, observant girl who finds her voice in 1988 Gaza City. 

The White Zone, Carolyn Marsden *NEW*

As American bombs fall on Baghdad during the Iraq War, ten-year-old cousins Nouri and Talib witness the growing violence between Sunni and Shiite Muslims. Suggested for readers aged 9-14. 

Wishtree, Katherine Applegate

The wise old oak tree, Red, decides to intervene to help a lonely girl named Samar, a Muslim girl, who is new to the neighborhood. Before he is cut down, he helps Samar find a friend.

 

Power Forward, Hena Khan

Fourth grader Zayd Saleem has serious dreams. He’s not just going to be a professional basketball player. He’s going to be a star. The first Pakistani-American kid in theNBA. 

 

Other Words for Home, Jasmine Warga

Written in verse,this book follows a young girl from her home in Syria as she moves with her mother to live with relatives in Cincinnati. 

 

Boy at the Back of the Class, Onjali Q Raúf

A child's perspective on the refugee crisis, highlighting the importance of friendship and kindness in a world that doesn't always make sense. 

 

The Red Pencil, Andrea Davis Pinkney

Life in Amira's Sudanese village is shattered when attackers arrive. She needs to find the strength to make the journey on foot to a refugee camp. The gift of a red pencil opens her mind.

 

Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard, Rick Riordan

Magnus is a smart, snarky kid living in the mythological Norse world because his dad is the god Frey. Friends help in his quest, including an ex-Valkyrie Islamic girl named Samirah Al-abbas

 

The Night Diary, Veera Hiranandani

Written in a diary as letters to her Mama, Nisha shares how her life is turned upside down when the British rule of India ends in 1947, splitting the country into two. 

 

Amina’s Voice, Hena Khan

A Pakistani-American Muslim girl struggles to stay true to her family’s vibrant culture while simultaneously blending in at school after tragedy strikes her community.

 

Nowhere Boy, Katherine Marsh

Ahmed is stuck in a city that wants nothing to do with him. Newly arrived in Brussels, Ahmed fled Aleppo, Syria, only to lose his father on the perilous journey. Now Ahmed’s struggling to get by on his own.

 

It Ain’t So Awful, Falafel, Firoozeh Dumas

Zomorod (Cindy) Yousefzadeh moves to California’s Newport Beach in the late 70s determined to shuck her brainy loner persona. Fitting in becomes more difficult as Iran makes headlines 

 

Amal Unbound, Aisha Saeed

The compelling story of a girl's fight to regain her life and dreams after being forced into indentured servitude.

 

Shooting Kabul, N.H. Senzai

Miriam gets left behind when her family flees Afghanistan. Her brother Fadi feels responsible and hopes to win a photography competition to take him to India so he can travel to find her.

 

Brave, Svetlana Chmakova

In his daydreams, Jensen is the biggest hero that ever was but his middle school reality is VERY different. He teams up with the school newspaper's dynamic duo, Jenny and Akilah

 

Ms.Marvel Volume 1: No Normal,  G Willow Wilson

The all-new Ms Marvel. Kamala Khan is just an ordinary girl from Jersey City until she is suddenly empowered with extraordinary gifts. 

 

Does my Head Look Big in This?, Randa Abdel-Fattah

Amal is a 16-year-old Melbourne teen with all the usual obsessions. She's also a Muslim. Tells the story of her decision to "shawl up" and its attendant anxieties.

 

Age 14-16

Tasting the Sky: A Palestinian Childhood, Ibtisam Barakat *NEW*

In this groundbreaking memoir set in Ramallah during the aftermath of the 1967 Six-Day War, Ibtisam Barakat captures what it is like to be a child whose world is shattered by war. Winner of the Arab American National Museum Book Award for Children's/YA Literature.

Where The Streets Had A Name, Randa Abdel-Fattah, *NEW* 

Thirteen-year-old Hayaat is on a mission. She believes a handful of soil from her grandmother's ancestral home in Jerusalem will save her beloved Sitti Zeynab's life. The only problem is the impenetrable wall that divides the West Bank, as well as the check points, the curfews, the permit system and Hayaat's best friend Samy, who is mainly interested in football and the latest elimination on X-Factor, but always manages to attract trouble. But luck is on their side. Hayaat and Samy have a curfew-free day to travel to Jerusalem. However, while their journey may only be a few kilometres long, it may take a lifetime to complete. The story, told through Hayaat’s eyes, provides readers with a clear window into a young teen’s life under the Israeli occupation.

Children of Israel, Children of Palestine (Children of Conflict), Laurel Holliday *NEW*

Israeli Jews and Palestinians appear side by side for the first time in this remarkable book to share powerful feelings and reflections on growing up in one of the world's longest and most dangerous conflicts. Here, thirty-six men and women, boys and girls, tell of their coming-of-age in a land of turmoil. From kibbutzim in Israel and the occupied territories to Palestinian refugee camps in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, Israeli Jews and Palestinians tell of tragedy and transcendence as they face their deepest fears and dream of a peaceful future.

Ten Things I Hate About Me, Randa Abdel-Fattah *NEW*

A 16-year-old Australian-Muslim-Lebanese teen wonders who she really is as she straddles two cultural realities.  Randa Abdel-Fattah's award-winning novel (suggested for readers aged 11-18) is about finding your place in life and learning to accept yourself and your culture.

Punching the Air, Ibi Zoboi and Yusef Salaam *New*

Amal’s name means Hope, but when he’s imprisoned after a fight with a gang of white boys, he finds it hard to hold on to the future. He’s always been an artist, but there’s little scope for his talent in prison. An extraordinary verse novel.

Ask Me No Questions, Marina Budhos

A Muslim immigrant teen struggles to hold her family together in the wake of 9/11 in this poignant novel from acclaimed author Marina Budhos.

 

19 Varieties of Gazelle, Naomi Shihab Nye

Naomi Shihab Nye has been writing about being Arab-American, about Jerusalem, about the West Bank, about family all her life. Sixty new and collected poems of the Middle East. 

 

In Search of Fatima - A Palestinian Story, Ghada Karmi

Tells of the author's personal experiences of displacement, loss and nostalgia against a backdrop of the major political events which have shaped Middle East conflict.

 

The Girl in the Tangerine Scarf, Mohja Kahf

Syrian immigrant Khadra Shamy is growing up in a devout, tightly knit Muslim family in 1970s Indiana, at the crossroads of bad polyester and Islamic dress codes. 

 

Guantanamo Boy, Anna Perera

Khalid, a fifteen-year-old boy from Rochdale, is abducted from Pakistan while on holiday. Taken to Guantanamo Bay and held without charge, his hopes and dreams are crushed.

 

A Little Piece of Ground, Elizabeth Laird

Karim Aboudi and his family are trapped in their Ramallah home by a strict curfew. When the curfew ends, he and his friend discover an unused patch of ground perfect for a football pitch. 

 

When Wings Expand, Mehded Maryam Sinclair

Writing on the pages of her journal, Nur, a teenage girl in Canada, charts her mother's cancer. When family and friends begin to encroach, Nur must face the prospect of her mother's death